Lincoln had beliefs. How do u think it effected Lincoln’s thought and actions during the Civil War?

brown suga asked:


Lincoln’s religious beliefs appeared to have evolved. What were these beliefs? How do u think it effected Lincoln’s thought and actions during the civil war?

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2 Responses to “Lincoln had beliefs. How do u think it effected Lincoln’s thought and actions during the Civil War?”

  1. anumber1cooks2000 says:

    All I know about his religious beliefs was that he considered himself a Unitarian. He was well read in the Bible and often used biblical phrasing in his speeches such as in the Gettysburg Address he says”Four score and seven years ago..” rather than just saying “87 years ago”.
    He did believe slavery should end but could not be honestly called an Abolitionist.During his presidency he did not force emancipation of the slaves at first. He was more interested in preserving the Union. Even after war broke out he still allowed slavery in the “Border States”, the slave states that remained in the Union.Lincoln while a kind man and against slavery was still a bit of a ****** and at first questioned the African-Americans ability to be a full participant in American politics.As the war progressed his views were changed and sympathy raised as he began to understand the positions of many successful free Black men and women, particularly his acquaintance with Frederick Douglas.

  2. heatherceana says:

    Lincoln believed that the economy, and thus the well-being, of the nation would be best served by preserving the nation – i.e. not allowing the Southern states to exercise their right to leave that union, as granted them in the Constitution of the United States of America.

    That was Lincoln’s main goal. He was willing to do almost anything to achieve it, even free the slaves in the South. Note: His proclamation did NOT free the slaves in the North.

    I do not believe that Lincoln’s religious beliefs had a great effect on his actions as a president, either before, during, or after the Civil War. There should be a link there to Senator Douglas’ letter expressing his disapproval at Lincoln’s continued hesitance to free the slaves.

    Some links about the War Between the States (so-called Civil War) and Lincoln. See last link for the Constitution of the United States of America.

    Excerpt: “Abraham Lincoln was “emphatically, the black man’s President,” wrote the black abolitionist Frederick Douglass in 1865, “the first to show any respect for their rights as men.” A decade later, however, in a speech at the unveiling of an emancipation monument in Washington, Douglass described Lincoln as “preeminently the white man’s President.” To his largely white audience on this occasion, Douglass declared that “you are the children of Abraham Lincoln. We are at best only his step-children.””

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