On a dusty backroom table in an old antique store: Lincoln The Unknown-with a surprise!

Lincoln The Unknown by Dale Carnegie

 

 

There were multitudes of old books scattered across a table in a back room of an “about to be closed” antique store. They were in no particular order.  Probably customers didn’t even bother to look through them.  I decided to check them out. Most of them were in pretty good shape. Then my eyes came across a volume of Lincoln the Unknown. It didn’t look like the edition contained in my personal library-it was obviously older. The book was also in decent shape. The dust jacket was certainly well preserved for the age of the book. There were no torn pages or markings inside. I decided, however, that I didn’t really need another copy of Lincoln The Unknown-I actually have more than one currently. Then I noticed something that caught my eye-it was signed by the author. Yes, Dale Carnegie had signed the book. I looked at the edition date-1938. Yes, the book certainly was worth purchasing. There was his signature. What a nice surprise!

Signature of Dale Carnegie inside Lincoln The Unknown

 

When I got home, I checked out his signature against those on the Internet. Exactly it! Two dollars well spent, I would say. Yes, I only paid two dollars. Every fan of Abraham Lincoln should read Carnegie’s Lincoln book. It is a great read. Yes, it has inaccuracies. What book doesn’t? But overall it is an easy read and fascinating work. Carnegie was not a Lincoln scholar. The book offers a glimpse into who Lincoln was-and should motivate one to read more about him.

Dale Carnegie died in 1955 at age 66. He was somewhat of a psychologist. He believed that one could change the behaviors of others by changing oneself. His most famous book (the one he is most known for) is How to Win Friends And Influence People. He also has a personal improvement training course that has been attended by more than 8 million people. As they, “not too shabby!”

The Internet had copies of the same edition of the book with Mr. Carnegie’s signature listed for sale at fifty dollars. Apparently, I got a good bargain. I don’t plan on selling my copy. Its enough to remember that I rescued it from a backroom table underneath a pile of other old books in an antique store that was closing for good.

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